AUTHOR LOGIN Close
Please enter author credentials to view Author Manual
Username:
Password:  
   
for New Author Registration
JAYPEE JOURNALS
International Scientific Journals from Jaypee
IndexCopernicus Value: 55.70
Home Instructions Editorial Board Current Issue Pubmed Archives Subscription Advertisement Contact Us
 
LOGIN  
Username: Password:
 
New Author Registration | Forgot Password ?
 
 
MGM Journal of Medical Sciences
Current Issue : Volume 5, Issue 1, January-March 2018
 
 
1.  From the Editors' Desk
From the Editors' Desk
Shibban K Kaul
[Pages No:iv]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | FREE

ABSTRACT

It is being increasingly recognized that active student engagement in teaching-learning processes in higher educational institutions is of paramount importance to achieve excellence in desired outcomes. This is particularly relevant to medical education. In spite of stringent rules, regulations, policies and curricula prescribed by regulatory bodies and councils for imparting medical education and training in medical schools, we find that desired outcomes in respect of knowledge and clinical skills acquired by medical graduates are still not up to the mark. There are significant gaps.

 
2.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Adenocarcinoma with Unknown Primary: Diagnostic Implications using Immunohistochemistry
Nidhi Anand, Saumya Shukla, Anshima Singh, Nuzhat Husain
[Pages No:1-5]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1172 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP) is a heterogeneous group of cancers defined by the presence of metastatic disease with no identifiable primary tumor at presentation. We undertook this study to assess the utility of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for the determination of primary tumor site in adenocarcinomas. This retrospective study included 51 cases with a morphological diagnosis of metastatic adenocarcinoma with unknown primary. Basic IHC panel that included cytokeratin 7 (CK-7), cytokeratin 20 (CK-20), pan-cytokeratin (pan-CK), thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1), and caudal type homebox 2 (CDX-2) was used. Additional extended panel with specific IHC markers was used in cases where the primary could not be determined using the basic panel. The male-to-female ratio was 1.4:1 with mean age of 50 years. The most common metastatic site was lymph node followed by liver. A conclusive diagnosis using IHC was achieved in 30 cases (58.82%). Specific diagnosis could be made in 8 cases (16%) using basic IHC panel.
Extended panel yielded specific diagnosis in additional 22 cases (43.13%). Primary site could not be determined using even both the panels in 21 cases (41.18%). The panels for identification of the primary need to be flexible depending on the site of metastasis, age/sex of the patient, and detailed history, which may determine sensitivity and specificity of primary detection.

Keywords: Adenocarcinoma, Immunohistochemistry, Neoplasms, Unknown primary.

How to cite this article: Anand N, Shukla S, Singh A, Husain N. Adenocarcinoma with Unknown Primary: Diagnostic Implications using Immunohistochemistry. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):1-5.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
3.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Satisfaction with Life among Dialyzed Patients: A Cantril Ladder Survey
Leszek Sulkowski, Maciej Matyja, Jerzy A Walocha, Artur Pasternak
[Pages No:6-11]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1173 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients consider hemodialysis (HD) to be an invasive and time-consuming procedure. The total success of HD depends not only on the medical parameters, but also on the patients’ satisfaction with life (SwL). The purpose of this study was to evaluate ESRD patients’ self-reported SwL and compare it with patient-related and dialysis-related factors.

Materials and methods: Fifty-nine patients [average age = 63.3 (standard deviation, SD = 12.3), 19 women (32.2%)] were evaluated in the survey. Both the present and expected 5-year SwL scores were evaluated according to the Cantril ladder (CL).

Findings: The relations between the present and expected 5-year CL-SwL scores and gender, education, fulfillment of medical recommendations, months on dialysis, type of vascular access, urea reduction ratio (URR), and ultrafiltration (UF) were excluded. The results indicated highly positive relationships between high expected 5-year CL-SwL scores and being in a relationship, having a kidney graft performed in the past, and willingness to have a kidney graft performed in the future. The group of ESRD patients who were not in a relationship, did not undergo kidney grafts in the past, did not want to undergo a kidney graft in the future, and the eldest patients expected their SwL in 5 years to be significantly lower.

Practical implications: Cantril ladder is a useful tool for SwL measurements among ESRD patients. The ESRD patients who expected their SwL in 5 years to be significantly lower (who were not in a relationship, did not undergo a kidney graft, did not desire a kidney graft, and the eldest patients) must be provided with psychological support.

Originality: This article fills the gap in the ESRD patients’ quality of life assessment. The self-reported present SwL was evaluated along with expected 5-year SwL.

Keywords: Cantril ladder, End-stage renal disease, Hemodialysis, Quality of life, Satisfaction with life, Vascular access.

How to cite this article: Sulkowski L, Matyja M, Walocha JA, Pasternak A. Satisfaction with Life among Dialyzed Patients: A Cantril Ladder Survey. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):6-11.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
4.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Follicular-patterned Thyroid Lesions
Akshay Agarwal, Manisha Y Tambekar, Reeta Dhar
[Pages No:12-16]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1174 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) plays a vital role in diagnosing thyroid lesions. However, follicularpatterned lesions need to be evaluated meticulously due to markedly overlapping cytomorphological features.

Aim: To study the role of FNAC in follicular-patterned lesions of thyroid.

Materials and methods: A retrospective and prospective study of 50 cases in which thyroid FNAC showed follicular-patterned lesions along with histopathological correlation wherever available was done over a period of 3 years (January 2013- December 2015).

Results: Out of 50 cases of follicular-patterned lesions, 44 cases were reported as adenomatous goiter (AG), 3 cases each of follicular neoplasm (FN), and follicular variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (FVPTC) on FNAC. Out of total 24 cases available for histopathological correlation, 5 cases (20.83%) showed discordance and the possible causes for the discordance were analyzed. The diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 83.3, 42.9, 100, 100, and 81.0% respectively.

Conclusion: Diagnosing follicular-patterned lesions on FNAC is challenging and will remain a “gray zone” for all cytopathologists. Scrupulous and thorough examination of all cytological smears should be done for predominant follicular pattern along with cytomorphological and background details to differentiate follicular-patterned thyroid lesions in order to minimize falsenegative diagnosis on FNAC.

Keywords: Fine-needle aspiration cytology, Follicular-patterned lesions, Thyroid.

How to cite this article: Agarwal A, Tambekar MY, Dhar R. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology of Follicular-patterned Thyroid Lesions. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):12-16.

Source of support: MGMIHS

Conflict of interest: None

 
5.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Indian Teaching Hospitals and Quality Health Care from Global Perspective: A Reality Check in Maharashtra, India
Archana Mishra, Prakash P Doke
[Pages No:17-22]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1175 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Teaching hospitals are the apex body of Indian hospital system and are expected to lead from the front in offering quality health care services in a safe environment by qualified and skilled staff. In this study, we conducted a reality check on some teaching hospitals in Maharashtra to assess gaps between declared policies and actual results achieved. We studied three parameters, i.e., human resource management (HRM), quality and safety, and communication and patient relations through three indicators, viz., policies, practices, and services from the Joint Commission International Accreditation (JCIA) standards in concurrence with National Accreditation Board for Hospitals (NABH). A total of 11 teaching hospitals were selected randomly across Maharashtra. The requisite data for the study were collected through personal interview from medical superintendents, employees, and patients. The responses were coded as: 10 (full compliance), 5 (partial compliance), and 0 (no compliance) as per NABH evaluation criteria.

The study shows that while teaching hospitals are maintaining most of the policies, they are poor in translating the standards into practices and services. Teaching hospitals need to lay greater emphasis on continuous training and development of their employees that should be focused on improving quality of patient care as per global standards as far as possible.

Keywords: Globalization, Health care, Quality, Standards, Teaching hospitals.

How to cite this article: Mishra A, Doke PP. Indian Teaching Hospitals and Quality Health Care from Global Perspective: A Reality Check in Maharashtra, India. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):17-22.

Source of support: MGMIHS

Conflict of interest: None

 
6.  ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Operative Management of Liver Injury in Polytrauma Patients: Experience of One Trauma Center
Leszek Sulkowski, Maciej Matyja, Artur Pasternak, Andrzej Matyja
[Pages No:23-25]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1176 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The liver is one of two most frequent abdominal parenchymal organs involved in trauma. Liver injury (LI) remains an important cause of trauma-related mortality. It is often accompanied by trauma to the other organs.

Materials, methods and results: During 9 years in the Provincial Trauma Center, out of 10,191 hospitalized patients, there were 1,702 trauma-related hospitalizations and 393 multiorgan traumas; 217 patients underwent surgery due to multiorgan trauma and coexisting LI. The most frequent coinvolved organs were spleen (83.9%), colon (33.6%), kidney (18.9%), small intestine (18.9%), pancreas (17.5%), gallbladder (16.6%), diaphragm (15.7%), and ileocecal valve (12.9%), with 33.2% of rib fractures and 31.3% of pneumothorax and pneumohemothorax. Grade of liver trauma was assessed according to American Association for the Surgery of Trauma—Organ Injury Scale (AAST-OIS). Fifty-two liver injuries (24,9%) were classified as AAST-OIS grade I, 54 (24.9%) as grade II, 46 (21.2%) as grade III, 41 (18.4%) as grade IV, and 25 (11.5%) as grade V. Patients received laparotomy (n = 205, 94.5%) or thoracolaparotomy (n = 12, 5.5%). Liver injuries were managed with electrocoagulation (n = 64, 29.5%), parenchymal sutures (n = 87, 40.1%), resectional debridement (n = 12, 5.5%), and perihepatic packing (n = 54, 24.9%).
Predominance of males and young patients with a mean age of 36 corresponds to accident statistics. Among patients receiving surgery, 88.9% had blunt trauma, with a high predominance of motor vehicle accidents.

Conclusion: Liver injuries predominantly follow a blunt abdominal injury. Despite good results of nonoperative management in hemodynamically stable patients with blunt trauma, surgery is still required due to complexity and seriousness of multiorgan injuries. Complex liver injuries require surgery in a well-equipped and active trauma center, since the mortality rate of surgical management of major liver injuries remains high.

Keywords: Liver injury, Multiorgan trauma, Polytrauma, Surgery.

How to cite this article: Sulkowski L, Matyja M, Pasternak A, Matyja A. Operative Management of Liver Injury in Polytrauma Patients: Experience of One Trauma Center. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):23-25.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

 
7.  REVIEW ARTICLE
The ASPIRE-to-Excellence Initiative: Can We recognize Excellence in Student Engagement with the Curriculum?
John Dent, Catherine Kennedy
[Pages No:26-30]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1177 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Research has demonstrated clear benefits of student engagement both in terms of student performance and for academic institutions. Policy guidelines from a variety of sources have advocated for student engagement on a variety of levels. Academic Support Program Inspiring Renaissance Educators (ASPIRE)-to-Excellence initiative represents a means for medical schools to gain recognition of their achievements in this area. We continually see examples of positive initiatives through our work with AMEE, an international association for medical education and the Essential Skills in Medical Education course for students (ESME-Student). We hope to encourage further debate and sharing of experiences to promote student engagement.

Keywords: Academic support program inspiring renaissance educators-to-excellence, Criteria, Curriculum development, Student engagement.

How to cite this article: Dent J, Kennedy C. The ASPIREto- Excellence Initiative: Can We recognize Excellence in Student Engagement with the Curriculum? MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):26-30.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: Dr J Dent and Dr C Kennedy are tutors in the ESME-Student course with AMEE

 
8.  REVIEW ARTICLE
Chest Tube Insertion
Jayant Karbhase, Pallavi S Kadam
[Pages No:31-32]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1178 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Chest tube insertion (also called tube thoracostomy) is one of the commonest procedures done in the emergency room by surgical residents. Proper placement of tube in the pleural space is essential to drain air, fluid, and/or blood adequately to decompress the lung and help it reexpand, which can be life-saving in some situations like tension pneumothorax. So surgical and emergency room residents must know the correct technique of chest tube insertion and connect it to underwater seal bag or bottle, with proper aseptic precautions. They must also be familiar with complications that can result from faulty technique of tube insertion, so that those complications can be avoided.

Keywords: Chest trauma, Thoracic drainage system, Thoracostomy, Tube insertion.

How to cite this article: Karbhase J, Kadam PS. Chest Tube Insertion. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):31-32.

Source of support: MGMIHS

Conflict of interest: None

 
9.  REVIEW ARTICLE
Over-the-counter Drug Market in India: A Study to understand the Current Regulatory Perspective and Industry Dynamics
Suniel G Deshpande, Rajesh K Srivastava
[Pages No:33-36]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1179 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Self-medication is on the rise in India. This is due to various reasons that are connected to the environment, demographic factors, changing consumer lifestyles, government policies, and strategies of the pharmaceutical industry. There has been a significant increase in the number of over-the-counter (OTC) products introduced in the health care market in India. On the regulatory front, the government is trying to consider legal recognition to the OTC category of drugs which currently do not have any legal recognition. Over-the-counter drugs in India can be advertised in media unlike some categories of the prescriptiononly drugs which are totally prohibited. The OTC drugs require a sales license except some drugs in Schedule K, which are categorized as household remedies. However, Ayurvedic drugs in India do not require a sales license and therefore, can be sold freely. It is expected that the regulatory policies would undergo changes initiated by the government in the near future.

Keywords: Drug utilization, Over-the-counter, Pharmaceutical industry, Prescriptions, Regulatory policy.

How to cite this article: Deshpande SG, Srivastava RK. Overthe- counter Drug Market in India: A Study to understand the Current Regulatory Perspective and Industry Dynamics. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):33-36.

Source of support: MGMIHS

Conflict of interest: None

 
10.  CASE REPORT
Dermoid Cyst of Pancreas
Brahma Dutta, Pravin Suryawanshi, Praful Pawar
[Pages No:37-39]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1180 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Pancreatic dermoid cyst is a rare clinical entity. We report the case of a 26-year-old female who presented with epigastric pain and weight loss for 1 month duration. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) showed large solid cystic mass in the tail of pancreas. At surgery, the entire mass was excised. Histopathologic report revealed it to be a dermoid cyst.

Keywords: Computed tomography, Dermoid cyst, Mature cystic teratoma, Pancreas.

How to cite this article: Dutta B, Suryawanshi P, Pawar P. Dermoid Cyst of Pancreas. MGM J Med Sci 2017;5(1):37-39.

Source of support: MGMIHS

Conflict of interest: None

 
11.  CASE REPORT
Wilson’s Disease presenting as Resistant Depression
Bharat R Shah, Shubhangi S Dere, Bindoo S Jadhav
[Pages No:40-42]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1181 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Wilson’s disease (WD) is rare, but it commonly presents with a variety of psychiatric symptoms.

Case report: A 31-year-old male presented with depression as the earliest manifestation. The depressive symptoms showed limited response to conventional antidepressants and electroconvulsive therapy in spite of compliance. Gradually, the patient showed neurological symptoms like motor slowing, speech disturbances, and abnormal movements which gave a clue toward organic etiology. Laboratory and neuroimaging findings along with ophthalmological examination helped in confirmation of diagnosis of WD. Introduction of the chelating agent penicillamine led to improvement in nonpsychiatric as well as psychiatric symptoms.

Conclusion: Psychiatric manifestations are common in WD. Depression was the earliest manifestation in our patient, which was not responding to usual treatment. Workup for organicity helped to diagnose WD and patient’s depressive symptoms responded to chelating therapy.

Keywords: Depression, Neuropsychiatric interface, Wilson’s disease.

How to cite this article: Shah BR, Dere SS, Jadhav BS. Wilson’s Disease presenting as Resistant Depression. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):40-42.

Source of support: MGMIHS

Conflict of interest: None

 
12.  CASE REPORT
Cornual Placenta Percreta with Uterine Rupture
Mayuri More, Sachin Kolhe, Sushil Kumar, Shabista Shaikh, Suryakanta Ghelot
[Pages No:43-45]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1182 | FREE

ABSTRACT

A 25-year-old woman, gravida 2, para 1 reported with history of 27 weeks pregnancy with pain abdomen and bleeding per vaginum (PV) of 2 days duration. She had undergone lower segment cesarean section (LSCS), done 3 years back during previous pregnancy. On examination, patient had pallor, tachycardia, and hypotension. The uterus was corresponding to the period of gestation. There was tenderness over left side of uterus and fetal heart sounds were absent. Per speculum examination revealed amniotic fluid leak mixed with blood. Ultrasonography (USG) findings were suggestive of moderate hemoperitoneum. Uterine rupture at the site of the previous LSCS scar was suspected. Patient was taken for emergency laparotomy. Intraoperative, previous cesarean scar was intact with the fetus inside the uterine cavity. There was left cornual implantation of placenta with a rent of about 4 cm. The placenta was protruding outside the uterus at left cornual end. Per-operative diagnosis of placenta percreta leading to uterine rupture was made. Obstetric hysterectomy was performed. The diagnosis of placenta percreta was confirmed later by histopathological examination.

Keywords: Obstetric hysterectomy, Placenta percreta, Uterine rupture.

How to cite this article: More M, Kolhe S, Kumar S, Shaikh S, Ghelot S. Cornual Placenta Percreta with Uterine Rupture. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):43-45.

Source of support: MGMIHS

Conflict of interest: None

 
13.  CASE REPORT
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage as a Complication of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis
Mitali Madhusmita, Archana Bhate, Anannya Mukherji
[Pages No:46-50]
Full Text PDF | Abstract | DOI : 10.5005/jp-journals-10036-1183 | FREE

ABSTRACT

Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) is an uncommon but important cause of stroke in young women. Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) secondary to CVST is a rare presentation. We present a case of 40-year-old female who presented with hemicranial headache. Magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) showed CVST along with SAH and venous infarcts. The patient improved on anticoagulant therapy. This report highlights the value of early diagnosis of CVST through neuroimaging and the importance of immediate anticoagulation as a part of patient management.

Keywords: Anticoagulant therapy, Cerebral venous thrombosis, Neuroimaging, Subarachnoid hemorrhage.

How to cite this article: Madhusmita M, Bhate A, Mukherji A. Subarachnoid Hemorrhage as a Complication of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis. MGM J Med Sci 2018;5(1):46-50.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: Noner

 
Article Iamge
 
     

© Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd. Jaypee Brothers Medical Publishers (P) Ltd.